PREMIUM PERSIAN SAFFRON – 1GRAM

$9.95

75 in stock (can be backordered)

Persian saffron threads, used to spice foods and teas, were widely suspected by foreigners of being a drugging agent and aphrodisiac. Such was the fear of this that travelers to Persia were forewarned about eating saffron-laced Persian cuisine. In addition, Persian saffron was dissolved along with sandalwood into water for use as a body wash for use after heavy work and perspiration under the hot Persian sun. Later, Persian saffron was heavily used by Alexander the Great and his forces during their Asian campaigns. There, they mixed saffron into their teas and dined on saffron rice.

Description

Premium Persian Saffron – 1gram

Saffron is an ancient spice going back over 1000 years. This spice has amazing medicinal properties along with many vitamins and minerals.

In ancient Persia saffron (Crocus sativus ‘Hausknechtii’) was cultivated at Derbena and Isfahan in the 10th century BC. There, Persian saffron threads have been found interwoven into ancient Persian royal carpets and funeral shrouds. Saffron was used by ancient Persian worshipers as a ritual offering to deities. It was also used as a brilliant yellow dye, a perfume, and a medicine. Thus, saffron threads would be scattered across beds and mixed into hot teas as a curative for bouts of melancholy. Indeed, Persian saffron threads, used to spice foods and teas, were widely suspected by foreigners of being a drugging agent and aphrodisiac. Such was the fear of this that travellers to Persia were forewarned about eating saffron-laced Persian cuisine. In addition, Persian saffron was dissolved along with sandalwood into water for use as a body wash for use after heavy work and perspiration under the hot Persian sun. Later, Persian saffron was heavily used by Alexander the Great and his forces during their Asian campaigns. There, they mixed saffron into their teas and dined on saffron rice. Alexander himself used saffron sprinkled in warm water as a bath. He hoped that it would heal his many wounds, and his faith in saffron grew with each treatment. Indeed, he recommended saffron baths for the ordinary men under him. The Greek soldiers, taken with saffron’s perceived curative properties, indeed continued the practice after they returned to Macedonia. Saffron cultivation also reached what is now Turkey, with harvesting concentrated around the northern town of Safranbolu; the area still known for its annual saffron harvest festivals.

Our Saffron is from a region in the middle east, that is known to produce the absolute best in the world, and “THERE IS A MAJOR DIFFERENCE”

The flavor is very unique and is used in many recipes around the world. Top Master Chefs use this spice in various seafood and entrees in

the finest restaurants in the world.

Lemon Saffron Risotto With Spring Vegetables

This lemon saffron risotto is super light and topped with green spring veggies of asparagus and fennel. One of the simplest risottos you can make but feels extra special and is ready in under 30 minutes.

Ingredients

3 tbsp butter
1 onion, finely chopped
2 pinches saffron
10 oz arborio rice
3/4 cup white wine
4 cups vegetable stock
2 fennel bulbs, sliced into thin wedges
1/2 lb asparagus
zest 1 lemon, plus juice for serving
4 eggs
4 tbsp Parmesan, plus more for serving
Olive oil, to drizzle

Directions

Heat butter in a large frying pan on a medium heat until melted, add the onions and cook, 5-7 minutes. Meanwhile, mix the saffron with 2 tbsp hot water and let infuse. Add rice to pan and coat rice well. Add the white wine and saffron water and cook, 2-3 minutes.
Add a third of the stock, stir and let the rice soak up the liquid. Repeat until all stock is added, stirring continuously.
Preheat oven to 425 F. Place the fennel and asparagus on a baking tray, drizzle with olive oil, add the lemon zest and season generously with salt and pepper. Toss together and bake, 10-15 minutes until tender.
Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil, add the eggs and cook for 4½ mins for soft boiled. Drain, peel and slice in half. Add cheese to risotto and season to taste. Serve with fennel, asparagus and eggs on top. Sprinkle remaining cheese, with lemon juice to finish.

Lemon-Saffron Salmon With Dill Rice

6–8 oz. skin-on salmon fillets ,5 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil

1tsp. Diamond Crystal or ½ tsp. Morton kosher salt

1/2 tsp Freshly ground black pepper

1tsp. saffron threads

3 lemons, divided

1 cup dill leaves with tender stems

1cup high-quality basmati rice

¼ cup parsley leaves with tender stems

1 cup plain thick yogurt (such as labneh, skyr, or Greek)

Steps

1.
Preheat oven to 400°. Pat four 6–8 oz. skin-on salmon fillets dry with a clean kitchen towel or paper towels. Place in a large glass or ceramic baking dish; drizzle with 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil and season all over with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Rub salmon to coat and arrange skin side down.

2.
Crush 1 tsp. saffron threads in a mortar and pestle (a small bowl and the handle of a wooden spoon also work well) until it’s mostly powder (it’s okay if it’s not perfectly powdery). Transfer to a small bowl and pour in 1 Tbsp. plus 1½ tsp. warm water. Stir until an intense sunset-orange hue and most of the saffron is dissolved (it will look like little crimson dots floating in an orange pool). Cut 2 lemons in half and squeeze juice into bowl, using your hand or a sieve to catch any seeds. Pour liquid over salmon, then turn fillets skin side up. Let sit at room temperature at least 15 minutes or until you’re at a stopping point with the rice.

Additional information

Weight .10 lbs

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